Summertime Festivals


Get set to sizzle this summer with a showcase of the best of New Zealand’s culture, music and food. From buskers to bandstands, foodie feasts and thought-provoking films, get to know the country and its amazing culture a little better at these great events.  

North Island

 

Auckland & surrounds





The festival for culture: 
SPLORE
Held in the Tapapakanga Park an hour southeast of Auckland, Splore has emerged as one of New Zealand’s best family-friendly festivals with an extensive visual arts programme and a big emphasis on community interaction and sustainability. Held from 17-19 February 2017, there are five stages given over to art, performance and music for the three-day event.
The festival for music mavens: 
LANEWAY

What started as a series of Sunday sessions in a small bar has turned into an Asia-Pacific festival phenomenon that had its inaugural run in Auckland in 2010. Held over two stages in Albert Park on 30 January, this year’s Laneway Festival will feature acts such as Aurora, Nick Murphy, Nao, Tame Impala, and Young Thug. 

The festival for your roots:
PASIFIKA

The Pasifika festival in Auckland celebrates Pacific Islander heritage and diversity. Held at Western Springs Park on the weekend of 25-26 March, the festival is divided into 11 cultural villages and attracts an incredible 80,000 visitors who come to try traditional cuisine, watch performances and learn about each culture. Free

The festival to laugh at:  
COMEDY FESTIVAL

Tickle your funny bone at the New Zealand International Comedy Festival held across venues in Auckland, Wellington and some regional cities from 27 April-21 May and featuring stand up, sketch, improv, theatre and musical comedy.


Stay at YHA Auckland International
Stay at YHA Auckland City    

 

 

Wellington, Taupo, Gisborne





The festival for local talent:
HOMEGROWN

With 48 acts, six stages and born and bred local talent, Homegrown remains a celebration of Kiwis who have made it big and a platform for new Kiwi talent. This year, artists including Elemeno-P, Fat Freddy's Drop, Shihad, Six60 and Aaradhna are scheduled to perform on the Wellington Waterfront on 4 March. 2017 is the gig's 10 year anniversary so it'll be a biggie!

The festival for surprises: 
FRINGE FESTIVAL

With over 100 self-produced events and shows, the Wellington Fringe Festival is a daring open-access event held in venues around the city each year. Scheduled to run from 10 February - 4 March, previous events have featured everything from hard-core bingo to fairytales on fire and aerial yoga, with 2017 acts set to push the envelope with innovative performances.

The festival that’s a left of centre: WANDERLUST

It’s a curious thing when yoga gurus get top billing alongside international musical acts like Xavier Rudd, but the Wanderlust festival does things a little differently. The popular international wellbeing festival is running in Great Lake Taupo area from 2-5 February and features a blend of yoga, music, meditation, workshops, hikes and inspiring lectures. Expect everything from medicinal native plant hikes to interpretive dance classes.

The festival for wild childs: 
RHYTHM AND VINES

What began with a bunch of uni mates putting on a festival in the family vineyard has become New Zealand’s favourite way to ring in New Year’s Eve. Rhythm and Vines runs from 29-31 December, the three-day festival near Gisborne attracts 30,000 people, with big name international artists often performing. Little innovations make the festival unique with dress-up days and a Vintage Club upgrade available.

Stay at YHA Wellington Stay at YHA Wellington Stay at YHA Taupo Stay at YHA Gisborne

 

South Island


Wanaka, Hokitika, Nelson, Christchurch




The festival for Autumn:
Festival of Colour

Worth a look is the low-key Southern Lakes Festival of Colour based in Wanaka with satellite events in Queenstown, Luggate, Hawea and Cromwell. Running from 4-10 April, the music, theatre and dance festival bills itself as the best little arts festival in New Zealand.

The Festival for food lovers:
WILDFOODS

You’ve really got to be a food lover to stomach what’s on offer at the Hokitika Wildfoods festival, held on 11 March on the West Coast of the South Island. The adventurous festival is aimed at sustainability and getting people to try things they normally wouldn’t. 15,000 visitors feast on everything from cow’s placenta pate to barbequed Huhu bugs and wildberry ice cream with cicada topping.

The festival to drink to:
MARCHFEST

Get into the groove of a new season at Marchfest held on 25 March in sunny Nelson. The day-long event features homegrown musical talent, a beer line up of local, never-before-tasted-by-the-public-brew, wine, cider juices and regional cuisine. Highlights include a gourmet beer-matching lunch, regular brew talks and indie/world music gigs.

 

The festival for the free: 
WORLD BUSKERS FESTIVAL

Fabulous, fast paced and best of all, free to the public, the World Buskers Festival has been held annually in Christchurch since 1993 and is one of the best celebrations of street theatre in the world. Both local and international acts pan for your pennies during the ten-day event from the 19-29 January in venues and on streets around the city centre. There are a mix of free and ticketed shows to suit everyone.

Stay at YHA Wanaka Stay at YHA Hokitika Stay at YHA Nelson Stay at YHA Christchurch

 

10 step Festival Survival Plan:
1.Book ahead for beds at the local YHA, tickets for events, flights into town, buses and parking at the venue.
2.Check the website, follow the festival twitter and download the app to plan your day and find out about delays.
3.Stash some cash in a safe place on your body BUT keep in mind most festivals are moving to special chipped wrist bands. Check the rules before you go. 
4.Hydrate: don’t get dehydrated. Drink plenty of water and try to avoid too much booze.
5.Bring ID, you’ll need it to get into the venue or buy alcohol.
6.Pick a central meeting point: essential if you’re with friends or a larger group and get separated. 
7.Shoes: wear comfy shoes (avoid heels) and if it’s rainy consider investing in a decent pair of knee-high gumboots to help you through the mud.
8.Get covered: a simple poncho or rain jacket can protect you from the elements.
9.Clothes: stay away from anything too fancy. Rips, tears, stains and sweat are common festival clothing killers 
10.Be sun smart and use sunscreen, wear a hat and slip on your sunnies to protect yourself from the summer sun.

10 step festival survival plan:

  1. Book ahead for beds at the local YHA, tickets for events, flights into town, buses and parking at the venue.
  2. Check the website, follow the festival twitter and download the app to plan your day and find out about delays.
  3. Stash some cash in a safe place on your body BUT keep in mind most festivals are moving to special chipped wrist bands. Check the rules before you go. 
  4. Hydrate: don’t get dehydrated. Drink plenty of water and try to avoid too much booze.
  5. Bring ID, you’ll need it to get into the venue or buy alcohol.
  6. Pick a central meeting point: essential if you’re with friends or a larger group and get separated. 
  7. Shoes: wear comfy shoes (avoid heels) and if it’s rainy consider investing in a decent pair of knee-high gumboots to help you through the mud.
  8. Get covered: a simple poncho or rain jacket can protect you from the elements.
  9. Clothes: stay away from anything too fancy. Rips, tears, stains and sweat are common festival clothing killers 
  10. Be sun smart and use sunscreen, wear a hat and slip on your sunnies to protect yourself from the summer sun.